The Circuit of Culture as a generative tool of contemporary analysis: Examining the construction of an education commodity (2022)

Contemporary studies in the field of education cannot afford to neglect the ever present interrelationships between power and politics, economics and consumption, representation and identity. In studying a recent cultural phenomenon in government schools, it became clear that a methodological tool that made sense of these interlinked processes was required. The Circuit of Culture (the Circuit) was refined as a tool of cultural analysis by British cultural theorists in the late 1990s. This paper will provide a brief history of the Circuit, some of its applications and critique, and an overview of the way the Circuit has been utilised to explore a topical cultural phenomenon involving the commodification of international student programs in Australian government schools (Leve, 2011). This study draws on the Circuit to open the way for an exploration of the multiple interrelated processes involved in the construction and management of an education commodity. The Circuit emphasizes the moments of production, representation, consumption, regulation and identity, and the interrelated articulations of these moments. It is found to be a useful and flexible tool for exploring the contemporary significance of, and possibilities for, the increasingly complex multiple modes and relationships of each of these significant moments in the construction and maintenance of an education commodity.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAARE 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program
EditorsJan Wright
Place of PublicationSydney NSW Australia
PublisherAustralian Association for Research in Education
Pages1 - 12
Number of pages12
Publication statusPublished - 2012
EventInternational Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education 2012 - University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Duration: 2 Dec 20126 Dec 2012
ConferenceInternational Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education 2012
Abbreviated titleAARE 2012
Country/TerritoryAustralia
CitySydney
Period2/12/126/12/12
OtherThe 2012 Annual Conference was a joint conference of AARE and APERA, incorporating a WERA Focal Meeting.
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Leve, A. M. (2012). The Circuit of Culture as a generative tool of contemporary analysis: Examining the construction of an education commodity. In J. Wright (Ed.), AARE 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program (pp. 1 - 12). Australian Association for Research in Education.

(Video) PRACTICE: Outside In | Inside Out

Leve, Annabelle Marian. / The Circuit of Culture as a generative tool of contemporary analysis: Examining the construction of an education commodity. AARE 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program. editor / Jan Wright. Sydney NSW Australia : Australian Association for Research in Education, 2012. pp. 1 - 12

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(Video) Compression: A philosophical and technical Introduction (1 of 4)

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Leve, AM 2012, The Circuit of Culture as a generative tool of contemporary analysis: Examining the construction of an education commodity. in J Wright (ed.), AARE 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program. Australian Association for Research in Education, Sydney NSW Australia, pp. 1 - 12, International Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education 2012, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2/12/12.

The Circuit of Culture as a generative tool of contemporary analysis: Examining the construction of an education commodity. / Leve, Annabelle Marian.

AARE 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program. ed. / Jan Wright. Sydney NSW Australia : Australian Association for Research in Education, 2012. p. 1 - 12.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

(Video) PARSE Dialogue on Fiction and Finance

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(Video) Juan Herrera: "Geographies of Activism: Cartographic Memory and Community Practices of Care"

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(Video) Collapse & Reconfiguration I & II: Introduction to Alt-Woke Praxis

Leve AM. The Circuit of Culture as a generative tool of contemporary analysis: Examining the construction of an education commodity. In Wright J, editor, AARE 2012 Conference Proceedings & Program. Sydney NSW Australia: Australian Association for Research in Education. 2012. p. 1 - 12

FAQs

What is the circuit of culture concept? ›

The Circuit of Culture incorporates the interrelated elements of representation, production, identity, regulation and consumption as processes through which cultural phenomena may be analysed (du Gay, et al., 1997).

Who came up with the circuit of culture? ›

We realized that the heuristic device adopted by those authors had something in common with another one, the “circuit of culture” proposed by Paul Du Gay et Al. in Doing Cultural Studies.

What is cultural studies anyway analysis? ›

Cultural studies concern with whole societies (or broader social formations) and how they move. It looks at social processes from another complementary point of view. To abstract, describe, and reconstitute in concrete studies forms through which human beings live, become conscious, sustain themselves subjectively.

What is representation Stuart Hall? ›

According to Hall (2005: 18-20), representation is the ability to describe or imagine. Representation is important because culture is always formed through meaning and language, in this case, language is a symbolic form or a form of representation.

What is popular culture Fiske? ›

Fiske differentiates between mass culture – the cultural "products" put out by an industrialized, capitalist society – and popular culture – the ways in which people use, abuse, and subvert these products to create their own meanings and messages.

What is popular culture as other? ›

Popular culture is the set of practices, beliefs, and objects that embody the most broadly shared meanings of a social system. It includes media objects, entertainment and leisure, fashion and trends, and linguistic conventions, among other things.

What is Technoculture and risk theory? ›

Risk theory reflects on the psycho-social impact of techno-culture where cultural responses to new devices are based upon awareness that they create new risk. So, we think what the solution of this problem is. But there is no any solution.

What is the importance of Cultural Studies? ›

The Cultural Studies major helps you understand the complexity of everyday life and the way that habits, texts, objects and beliefs are socially patterned and laden with values and meaning. It will provide you with a range of tools to analyse how cultural practices and meanings are produced, circulated and exchanged.

Why is the study of culture important? ›

In addition to its intrinsic value, culture provides important social and economic benefits. With improved learning and health, increased tolerance, and opportunities to come together with others, culture enhances our quality of life and increases overall well-being for both individuals and communities.

What are the key concepts of Cultural Studies? ›

Key Concepts in Cultural Studies–Representation, materialism, Non-reductionism, Articulation, Power, Popular Culture, Texts and Readers, subjectivity and Identity.

How do you apply Stuart Hall representation theory? ›

Stuart Hall's Representation Theory - Media Studies - YouTube

What is representation PDF? ›

A representation is a visual, written, or audio. depiction of something or someone. This term also. refers broadly to what images and texts mean, the. meanings that they potentially convey, and how they.

How does Hall's theory modify the basic communication model? ›

Hall's appropriation of a Marxist vocabulary allows him to replace the linearity of traditional models of communication with a circuit. In this circuit the 'sender' has become a 'producer' and the 'receiver' a 'consumer'.

What is the meaning of cultural studies? ›

Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary field, drawing on theories and practices from a range of humanities and social sciences disciplines, that seeks to investigate the ways in which cultures produce and are produced.

How do you do cultural analysis? ›

Write an introduction for your cultural analysis that sets a tantalizing stage for the paper. Provide a brief overview of the culture you have chosen to profile and then segue to your theme. Place the theme in context by explaining what it is that makes it such a profoundly important part of the culture.

What is an example of cultural studies? ›

We take a definitive view of what constitutes a properly Cultural Studies approach as we study, for example, the dialectical relationships among media and new media, social institutions such as gender and race, and the class character of capitalist society.

What are the five features of cultural studies? ›

Culture has five basic characteristics: It is learned, shared, based on symbols, integrated, and dynamic.
...
All cultures share these basic features.
  • Culture is learned. ...
  • Culture is shared. ...
  • Culture is based on symbols. ...
  • Culture is integrated. ...
  • Culture is dynamic.

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